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Long-term field application of sewage sludge increases the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in soil
Chen, Qinglin; An, Xinli; Li, Hu; Su, Jianqiang; Ma, Yibing; Zhu, Yong-Guan
2016-08
Source PublicationENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL
Volume92-93Pages:1-10
AbstractSewage sludge and manure are common soil amendments in crop production; however, their impact on the abundance and diversity of the antibiotic resistome in soil remains elusive. In this study, by using high throughput sequencing and high-throughput quantitative PCR, the patterns of bacterial community and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in a long-term field experiment were investigated to gain insights into these impacts. A total of 130 unique ARGs and 5 mobile genetic elements (MGEs) were detected and the long-term application of sewage sludge and chicken manure significantly increased the abundance and diversity of ARGs in the soil. Genes conferring resistance to beta-lactams, tetracyclines, and multiple drugs were dominant in the samples. Sewage sludge or chicken manure applications caused significant enrichment of 108 unique ARGs and MGEs with a maximum enrichment of up to 3845 folds for mexF. The enrichment of MGEs suggested that the application of sewage sludge or manure may accelerate the dissemination of ARGs in soil through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Based on the co-occurrence pattern of ARGs subtypes revealed by network analysis, aacC, oprD and mphA-02, were proposed to be potential indicators for quantitative estimation of the co-occurring ARGs subtypes abundance by-power functions. The application of sewage sludge and manure resulted in significant increase of bacterial diversity in soil, Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi were the dominant phyla (>10% in each sample). Five bacterial phyla (Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes and Bacteroidetes) were found to be significantly correlated with the ARGs in soil. Mantel test and variation partitioning analysis (VPA) suggested that bacterial community shifts, rather than MGEs, is the major driver shaping the antibiotic resistome. Additionally, the co-occurrence pattern between ARGs and microbial taxa revealed by network analysis indicated that four bacterial families might be potential hosts of ARGs. These results may shed light on the mechanism underlining the effects of amendments of sewage sludge or manure on the occurrence and dissemination of ARGs in soil. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Department土壤环境科学实验室
KeywordAntibiotic Resistance Genes Bacterial Pathogens Horizontal Gene Transfer Network Analysis Sewage Sludge
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Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttps://ir.rcees.ac.cn/handle/311016/36259
Collection土壤环境科学实验室
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Chen, Qinglin,An, Xinli,Li, Hu,et al. Long-term field application of sewage sludge increases the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in soil[J]. ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL,2016,92-93:1-10.
APA Chen, Qinglin,An, Xinli,Li, Hu,Su, Jianqiang,Ma, Yibing,&Zhu, Yong-Guan.(2016).Long-term field application of sewage sludge increases the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in soil.ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL,92-93,1-10.
MLA Chen, Qinglin,et al."Long-term field application of sewage sludge increases the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in soil".ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL 92-93(2016):1-10.
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